Meet us on:
 
Entire Site
    Try our fun game

    Dueling book covers…may the best design win!

    Random Quote
    "Money can't buy friends, but it can get you a better class of enemy."
     

    Subscribe to Our Newsletter

    Follow us on Twitter

    Never miss a good book again! Follow Read Print on Twitter

    Index

    • Rate it:
    • 1 Favorite on Read Print
    Launch Reading Mode
    Chapter 25
    Previous Chapter
    ABORTION, neutralization of working bees an act of, 250

    Accessory touches, varying Buffon on, 92

    Accident, many of our best thoughts come thoughtlessly, 48, 384

    ---- profiting by, 51, 53

    ---- and discovery of theory connecting meteors with comets, 53

    ---- shaking the bag to see what will come out, 53

    ---- effects of, transmitted to offspring, Dr. Erasmus Darwin, 224

    ---- and design, the line between these hard to draw, 384

    Accidental variations thrown for as with dice, 3

    Accumulation of variations, C. Darwin deals with the, and not with the origin of, 340, 341

    ---- of small divergencies, Buffon on the, 103

    Accurate, survival of fittest more accurate than Nat. Sel. and sometimes equally convenient, 9, 354, 365

    Act of Parliament, Natural Selection compared to a certain kind of, 358

    Age, old, the phenomena of, 67, 204, 381

    Aggregation, the spirit of the age tends towards, 397, 398

    Ahead, no organism sees very far, 44, 48, 54, 384

    Aldrovandus, Buffon on the learned, 93

    Alive, when we must not say that an animal is alive (to be retracted), 279

    Allen, Grant, on 'Evolution, Old and New,' 386-388

    ---- on the decay of criticism, 388

    ---- calls Evolutionism "an almost exclusively English impulse," 393

    Alternations of fat and lean years, Buffon on, 125

    Amoeba, the, did not conceive the idea of an eye and work towards it, 43, 44, 384

    Analogies, false, all words are apt to turn out to be, 365

    Animals, contracts among, Dr. E. Darwin on, 205

    Ape, the, and man, 90

    Apes and monkeys, Buffon on, 153

    ---- and children fall on all-fours at the approach of danger, 312

    Apparentibus, de non, et non existentibus, &c., 36

    Appearances, rather superficial, our only guide to classification, 34, 35, 36, 198, 204

    Appetency, Paley's argument against the view that structures have been developed through, 22, 45

    Aristides, C. Darwin as just as, 363

    Aristotle denied teleology, 4

    Artificial and real foot, differences between, 25

    Asceticism, virtue errs on the side of excess rather than on that of, 35

    Ass, the, and horse, Buffon's pregnant passage on their relationship, 80, 90, 91, 100, 101, 142, 143, 155, 164, 311

    Authority, a hard thing to weigh, 253

    BACON, F., on evolution, 69

    Balzac, quotation from, on memory and instinct, 67

    Bark, Erasmus Darwin's theory of, 208

    Beaver, trowel incorporated into the beaver's organism, 8

    Bees, neutralization of working, an act of abortion, 250

    Beetles, Madeira, Lamarck and C. Darwin's views of their winglessness compared, 373, 380

    Begin, How could the eye begin? 46, 47

    Beginnings, of complex structures, a difficulty in the way of natural selection, 21, 22

    ---- difficulty of accounting for, 46, 47

    ---- a matter of conjecture and inference, 48

    Behind, more moral to be behind the age than in front of it, 401

    Best, making the best of whatever power one has, 50

    Bird, how birds became web-footed, 48, 49, 51

    ---- a, will modify its nest a little, under altered circumstances, 55

    ---- Buffon on, 170, &c.

    ---- nests, Dr. Erasmus Darwin's failure to connect the power to make them with memory, 201, 203

    ---- aquatic and wading, Lamarck on, 305

    Bishop, and Evêque, common derivation of, 355

    Blindfolded, we are so far, that we can see a few steps in front, but no more, 44

    ---- us, C. Darwin has almost ostentatiously, 346

    Blindly, forces interacting blindly, 59

    Body and mind, Lamarck on, 338, 339, 341

    Brain, Lamarck had brain upon the brain, 36

    ---- Buffon on the, 131, 133, &c.

    Brevity may be the soul of wit, but, &c., 315

    Breeding, and feeding, 222

    Brown-Séquard, his experiments on guinea-pigs' legs, 303

    Buds, individuality of, Dr. Erasmus Darwin on the, 207, 208

    Buffalo, Buffon on the, 148, &c.

    Buffon, profoundly superficial, 34

    ---- plus il a su, plus il a pu, &c., 44

    ---- dans l'animal il y a moins de jugement que de sentiment, 51

    ---- ignorance concerning, 61

    ---- memoir of, 74, &c.

    ---- on glory, genius, and style, 76, 77

    ---- ironical character of his work and method (see Irony), 78, &c., 171

    ---- on the ass, horse, and zebra, 80, 90, 91, 100, 101, 142, 143, 155, 164, 311

    ---- would not play the part of Rousseau or Voltaire, 81

    ---- Sir W. Jardine on, and the Sorbonne, 82

    ---- regards all animal and vegetable life as from one common source, 90

    ---- if a single species has ever been found under domestication, &c., 91

    ---- on plaisanterie, and the learned Aldrovandus, 93, &c.

    ---- his compromise, 92

    ---- accessory touches, 92

    ---- "especially" the same, 96

    ---- fluctuation of opinion an unfounded charge, 97, &c., 164

    ---- on the accumulation of small divergencies, 103

    ---- began preaching evolution almost on his first page, 104

    ---- chapter on the dégénération des animaux, equivalent to "on descent with modification," 104, &c.

    ---- difference of opinion between him and Erasmus Darwin and Lamarck, 105

    ---- probably did not differ from Lamarck, 105

    ---- on direct action of changed conditions, 105, 145, 147

    ---- on man and the lower animals, 108

    ---- on classification, 108, 109, 141

    ---- on animals and plants, 109, 110

    ---- on reason and instinct, 110, 115

    ---- on final causes (the pig), 118, &c.

    ---- on hybridism, 117, 118

    ---- rudimentary organs, 120

    ---- on animals under domestication, 121, &c., 148

    ---- deals with these early, as giving him the best opportunities for illustrating the theory of evolution, 276

    ---- approaches natural selection in his "by some chance common enough in Nature," 122

    ---- preaching on the hare when he should have preached on the rabbit out of pure love of mischief, 123

    ---- resumption of feral characteristics, 123

    ---- on the geometrical ratio of increase, 123, &c.

    ---- alternation of fat and lean years, 125

    ---- equilibrium of Nature, 125

    ---- "au réel," 126

    ---- on violent death, 126

    ---- on sensation, 126, &c.

    ---- on the interaction of organ and sense, 127

    ---- the carnivora, 126

    ---- his criterion of what name a thing is to bear, 127

    ---- his criterion of perception and sensation, 127

    ---- on the unity of the individual, 127, 128

    ---- satirizes our habit of judging all things by our own standards, 129

    ---- the diaphragm, 129

    ---- on the stock and the diaphragm, 130

    ---- distinction between perception and sensation, 129, 130

    ---- on the meninges, 132

    ---- on the brain, 131, 133, &c.

    ---- on scientific orthodoxy and mystification, 138

    ---- on the relativity of science, 140

    ---- on nomenclature and knowledge, 141

    ---- on the genus felis, 143

    ---- on the lion and the tiger, 143, 145

    ---- on the animals of the old and new world, 145, &c.

    ---- on changed geographical distribution of land and water, 145, 164

    ---- on extinct species, 146

    ---- hates the new world, 146

    ---- on heredity and habit, 148, 159, 160, 161, 162

    ---- approaches Erasmus Darwin and Lamarck, re the Buffalo, Camel, and Llama, 148, 160, 161

    ---- on oneness of personality between parents and offspring, 151

    ---- on the organic and inorganic, 153, &c.

    ---- on apes and monkeys, 153, &c.

    ---- on the causes or means of the transformation of species, 159, &c.

    ---- on generic (as well as specific) differences, 164

    ---- on plants under domestication, 167

    ---- on pigeons and fowls, 169

    ---- on birds, 170, &c.

    ---- the assistance he rendered to Lamarck, 237, 258

    ---- Isidore Geoffroy's failure to understand, 328

    ---- Colonel, 75

    Bulk, a sine quâ non for success in literature or science, 315

    Bull running, Tutbury, and Erasmus Darwin, 187

    CAMEL, Buffon on the hereditary ills of the, 161

    Cant, and rudimentary organs, 38

    Captandum, all good things are done ad, 85

    Carnivora, Buffon on the, 126

    Carriage, Dr. Erasmus Darwin's, 181

    Cat, family, Buffon on the, 142, &c.

    ---- with a mane and long tail, 143

    Cataclysms, the good cells that get exterminated during the cataclysms of our own development, 75

    Catastrophes, Lamarck on, 277

    Causes, or "means," of modification, 301

    ---- C. Darwin says that Buffon has not entered on the, 104, &c.

    ---- C. Darwin gets us into a fog about, 345, &c.

    Change, under changed circumstances, Mr. Patrick Matthew on, 318

    Charity, the greatest of these is, 77

    Church, a, like a second chamber, 400

    ---- the world better with than without, 400

    ---- should be like the fly-wheel of a steam engine, 104

    Circonstances (see Conditions of Existence), Lamarck on, 268, 281

    Circumstance, suiting power, a, Mr. Patrick Matthew on, 318-321

    Classification, rather superficial appearances our best guide to, 34, 35, 36, 198, 204

    ---- Buffon on, 108, 109, 141

    Clear, an ineradicable tendency to make things, 92

    Clifford, Professor, on "Design," 6, 7

    Climbing plants, the movements of, Dr. Erasmus Darwin on, 209

    Coherency, the persistency of ideas the best argument in support of their legitimate connection, 23

    Coleridge, on "Darwinising," 21

    Common terms, our, involve the connection between memory and heredity, 201, 205

    ---- descent, the "hidden bond" of Lamarck, as also of C. Darwin, 271

    Comparative anatomy, Lamarck on, 266, &c.

    Complex structures, the incipiency of, a difficulty in the way of the natural selection view of evolution, 21, 22

    Compromise, Buffon's, 92

    Conditions of existence, the very essence of condition involves that there shall be penalty in case of non-fulfilment, 352, 376, 377

    ---- and the winglessness of Madeira beetles, 373, &c.

    ---- according to C. Darwin, "include" and yet "are fully embraced by" natural selection, 355

    ---- identical with "natural selection," 351-354

    ---- Étienne Geoffroy, and Lamarck on, 326, 327, 328

    ---- Buffon on the, 103; difference between Buffon's and Lamarck's view of their action, 105

    ---- direct action of changed, Buffon on the, 145, 147, 160

    ---- Lamarck on, 105, 268, 270, 271, 275, 277, 278, 281, 291, 292, 294, 295, 298, 299, 300, &c.

    Continuity in discontinuity, and vice versâ, 47

    Contracts of animals, Dr. E. Darwin on the, 205

    Contrivance, does organism show signs of this? 2

    Convenient, not only sometimes, but always, more, 365

    Corkscrew for corks, and lungs for respiration, Prof. Clifford on, 7. See also p. 58

    ---- we should have grown a, if drawing corks had been important to us, 7

    Creator, a, who is not an organism, unintelligible, 6, 11, 24

    Criticising, difficulty of, without knowing more than the mere facts which are to be criticised, 172

    Criticism, Miss Seward's, on Dr. Darwin's "Elegy," 189

    ---- Grant Allen on the decay of, 388

    Crux, the, of the early evolutionist, 35

    Cuttle-fish, natural selection like the secretion of a, 332

    DAMNATION, praising with faint, 111

    Darwin, Charles, on the eye, denies design, 8

    ---- declares variation to be the cause of variation, 8, 347, 369

    ---- and blind chance working on whither; the accumulation of innumerable lucky accidents, 41, 42

    ---- our indebtedness to, 62, 66, 335

    ---- has adopted one half of Isidore Geoffroy's conclusion without verifying either, 83

    ---- on Buffon's fluctuation of opinion, 97

    ---- on Isidore Geoffroy, 97

    ---- his assertion that Buffon has not entered on the "causes or means" of transformation, 104

    ---- his meagre notice of his grandfather, 196

    ---- his treatment of the author of the "Vestiges of Creation," 65, 247, 248

    ---- attributes the characteristics of neuter insects to natural selection, 249

    ---- his treatment of Lamarck, 249, 250, 251, 298, 314, 376

    ---- "great is the power of steady misrepresentation," 251

    ---- his "happy simplicity" about animals and plants under domestication, 276

    ---- his notice of Mr. Patrick Matthew in the imperfect historical sketch which he has prefaced to the "Origin of Species," 315, 316

    ---- points of agreement between him and Lamarck, 335-337

    ---- sees no broad principle underlying variation, 339

    ---- dwells on the accumulation of variations, the origination of which he leaves unaccounted for, 340, 341

    ---- his variations being due to no general underlying principle, will not tend to appear in definite directions, nor to many individuals at a time, nor to be constant for long together, 342

    ---- speaks of natural selection as a cause of modification, while declaring it to be a means only, 345, &c.

    ---- his explanation of this, 384, &c.

    ---- his dilemma, as regards the "Origin of Species," 346

    ---- declares the fact of variation to be the cause of variation, 8, 347, 369

    ---- if he had told us more of what Buffon, &c., said, and where they were wrong, he would have taken a course, &c., 357

    ---- on the ease with which we can hide our ignorance under a cloud of words, 358

    ---- apologizes for having underrated the frequency and importance of variation due to spontaneous variability, 358

    ---- his "Origin of Species" like the opinion of a lawyer who wanted to leave loopholes, or an Act of Parliament full of repealed and inserted clauses, 358

    ---- accused of confusion and inaccuracy of thought, 359

    ---- as just as Aristides himself, 364

    ---- most candid literary opponent in the world, 364

    ---- declares Nature to be the most important means of modification, and variation to be the cause of variations, 369

    ---- like a will-o'-the-wisp, 372

    ---- disuse, the main agent in reducing wings of Madeira beetles, 377

    ---- how he and Lamarck treat the winglessness of Madeira beetles respectively, 373-380

    ---- an example of his "manner," 378

    ---- the way in which he met "Evolution, Old and New," 393

    Darwin, Erasmus, never quite recognized design, 39

    ---- ignorance concerning, 61

    ---- on reason and instinct, 115, &c.

    ---- life of, 173, &c.

    ---- in Nottingham market-place, 182, 184, 197

    ---- and Dr. Johnson, 184, 185

    ---- and Tutbury bull running, 187

    ---- his poetry about the pump, and illustration, 84, 193

    ---- should have given his evolution theory a book to itself, 197

    ---- had no wish to see far beyond the obvious, 197

    ---- must be admitted to have missed detecting Buffon's humour, 83, 84, 197

    ---- did not attribute instincts and structures to memory pure and simple, 198

    ---- on the reasoning powers of animals, and on instinct, 201, 205

    ---- his failure to connect memory and instinct, as with birds' nests, 201-203

    ---- failed to see the four main propositions which I contended for in "Life and Habit," 37, 203, 204

    ---- on the analogies between animal and vegetable life, 206, &c.

    ---- on sensitive plants, 206, 210

    ---- on the individuality of buds, and his theory of bark, 207, 208

    ---- on the movements of climbing plants, 209

    ---- on the oneness of personality between parents and offspring, 214; the embryo not a new animal, 215

    ---- on animals under domestication, 223

    ---- on the effects of accidents transmitted to offspring, 224

    ---- sees struggle, and hence modification, turn mainly round three great wants, 226, 229, 257, 279

    ---- on desire as a means of modification, 226, 228, 259

    ---- by a slip approaches the error of his grandson, 227, 228

    ---- on embryonic metamorphoses, 230, 231

    ---- believed animals and plants to be descended from a common stock, 233

    ---- and Lamarck compared, 257

    ---- on the struggle of existence, and the survival of the fittest, 227, 232, 259

    Darwin, Mrs. Erasmus, death-bed of, 178

    Darwin, Francis, mentioned, 109

    ---- his interesting lecture, 206

    ---- does not use the expression "natural selection," 368

    Darwinising, Coleridge on, 21

    Darwinism, the old Darwinism involves desire, invention, and design, 58

    ---- modern, falling into disfavour, 60

    ---- and evolution not to be confounded, 360, 361

    Day, the portrait of, by Wright of Derby, 180

    Death, violent, Buffon on, 126

    ---- of Dr. Erasmus Darwin, 193, 194

    Death-bed of Mrs. Erasmus Darwin, 178

    Deed, illustration drawn from a very intricate, 28

    Definite, with Lamarck the variations are, 341, 344

    Dégénérations, 87

    Demand and supply, like power and desire, 222, 300

    Demonstrative case, "this demonstrative case of neuter insects, &c.," 249, 298, 314

    Descent, with modification, spoken of as though synonymous with natural selection, 248, 356

    Design, and organism, shall we or shall we not connect these ideas? 2

    ---- Aristotle denied, Plato upheld, Haeckel on, 4

    ---- Prof. Clifford's denial of, 6, 7

    ---- does certainly involve a designer who has an organism, who can think, and make mistakes, 6, 24

    ---- a belief in both design and evolution, commonly held to be incompatible, 9

    ---- Sir W. Thomson and Sir J. Herschel on, 11

    ---- Paley on, 12, &c.

    ---- light thrown by embryology on the method of, 25

    ---- G. H. Lewes opposes, 26

    ---- the three positions in respect to, taken by Charles Darwin, Paley, and the earlier evolutionists, 31

    ---- the first evolutionists did not see that their view of evolution involved design, 34

    ---- from within as much design as from without, 36

    ---- was equivalent to theological design, with the early evolutionists, 36

    ---- if each step is taken designedly, the whole is done designedly, 52, 384

    ---- and accident, the line between them hard to draw; shaking the bag, &c., 53, 384

    ---- instinct originated in, 54

    ---- as much lost sight of with old-established forms of the steam-engine as with birds' nests or the wheel, 55

    ---- Dr. E. Darwin's failure to see that evolution involves design, 195

    ---- we feel the want of, as much as we do of evolution, 407

    ---- evolution not only tolerates, but cannot get on without, 408

    Designer, "I believe in an organic and tangible designer of every complex structure," 6

    ---- "where is he? show him to us," &c., 29, 30

    ---- the, of any organism, the organism itself, 30, 31, 40

    Desire and power, interaction of, 44, 45, 47, 127, 217, 221, 300, 322

    ---- and power, like wealth, 222

    ---- as a means of modification, Dr. Erasmus Darwin on, 226, 228, 259

    Development, the history of organic, the history of a moral struggle, 45

    ---- always due to making the best of the present, 50

    Devils, 20,000, dancing a saraband on the point of a needle, 216

    Dew drop, or lens, the, and Lord Rosse's telescope, 44, 47

    Diaphragm, Buffon on the, 129

    Dice, accidental variations thrown for as with, 3

    Difference between animal and ordinary mechanism, 24

    ---- the main, between the manufacture of tools and that of organs, 39

    Dilemma, C. Darwin's, 346

    Direct action of changed conditions, Buffon on the, 105, 145, 147, 160

    Discontinuity in continuity, 47

    Disease, accidents followed by, 303

    Disintegration, Protestantism tends towards, 397

    Distribution, geographical, changed, Buffon on, 145, 164

    Disuse, and the winglessness of Madeira beetles, we are almost surprised to find that they are connected at all, 375

    ---- the main agent in reducing the wings of Madeira beetles, 377

    ---- some examples of the effect of, adduced by Lamarck, 378

    Dog, Buffon on the, 120

    ---- Lamarck on the various breeds of the, 297

    Domestication, a single case of a species formed under domestication sufficient to remove the à priori difficulty from a comprehensive theory of evolution, 90, 91, 311

    ---- plants under, Buffon on, 167, &c.

    ---- Buffon on animals under, 103, 120, &c., 148, &c., 159, &c., 276

    ---- animals under, Dr. Erasmus Darwin on, 223

    ---- animals under, Buffon on, 121, &c., 148, 276

    ---- C. Darwin on, 276

    ---- animals and plants under, Lamarck on, 275, 293, 296, 297, 300

    ---- animals and plants under, Mr. Patrick Matthew on, 324

    Door, the doing anything well will open the door for doing something else, 51

    Ducks, our domesticated, why they cannot fly like wild ones, 296, 309

    EARN, "you are but doing your best to earn an honest living," 29

    Ears are never found in a rudimentary condition, 379

    Eat, or be eaten, 177

    Effort, Paley's argument that structures have not been developed through, 22, 45

    ---- too much, as vicious as indolence, 35

    ---- "neither too much nor too little," 50

    ---- Herculean, condemned, 197

    Egyptian mummies, Lamarck on, 274, 275

    Embryology, the light it throws upon the mode in which organisms have been designed, 25

    Embryonic metamorphoses, Erasmus Darwin on, 230, 231

    Embryonic development, Lamarck on, 289

    Encyclical, the Pope's, on St. Thomas Aquinas, 402, &c.

    Endeavour, Paley's argument against the view that structures have been developed through, 22, 45

    Endowment, the new orthodoxy, which is clamouring for, 360

    English wines, Dr. Erasmus Darwin's preference for, 175

    Environment. See Conditions of Existence

    Equilibrium, the, of Nature, Buffon on the, 125

    Err, the power to, rated highly, 29

    ---- "it is on this margin that we may err or wander," 50

    ---- virtue ever errs on the side of excess, 35

    Error, importance of, dependent on the distance, rather than the direction, 50

    "Especially" the same, 92, 96

    Ethiopian, the, can change his skin, if it becomes worth his while to try long enough, 40

    Evêque and bishop, common derivation of, 355

    Everlasting, God, how far, 32

    Evolution, commonly held incompatible with design, 9

    ---- Paley, its first serious opponent in England, 21

    ---- Sir Walter Raleigh on, 21, 70

    ---- must stand or fall according as it rests on a purposive foundation or no, 60

    ---- brief summary of its six principal stages, 62, &c.

    ---- Bacon on, 69

    ---- the theory of, as apart from the evidence in support of it, 332

    ---- C. Darwin and Lamarck are equally intent upon establishing the same theory of evolution, 335-337

    ---- and Darwinism, not to be confounded, 360, 361

    ---- Rome and Pantheism meet in, 403

    Evolutionists, the early, did not know that they accepted teleology, 34

    ---- the early, saw design, only as design by the God of theologians, 36

    Experience and instinct, Mr. Patrick Matthew on, 322

    Extinct species, Lamarck on, 277

    ---- Buffon on, 146, 277

    Eye, no creature that had nothing like an eye ever set itself to conceive one and grow one, 44, 387

    ---- Paley asks "how will our philosopher get an eye?" 46

    ---- of flat fish, Lamarck on the, 307

    ---- Lamarck on the, of underground and cave-inhabiting animals, 378

    ---- disappear and reappear in the scale of organism according to the power of using them, 379

    FAITH, forms of, or faiths of form, &c., 339

    Familiarity, with a little, such superficial objections will be forgotten, 367

    Far ahead, no organism ever saw an improvement a long way off and made towards it, 43, 44, 48, 49, 54, 384

    Father, the man who could be father of such a son and retain his affection, &c., 76

    Factors, there have been two, of modification, one producing and the other accumulating variations, 227

    Fecundity, alternate years of, Buffon on, 125

    Feeding and breeding, 222

    Feel, if plants and animals look as if they feel, let us say they feel, 198

    Feeling, there is more feeling than reason in animals, 51

    Feral characteristics, resumption of, Buffon on, 123

    Final causes, the doctrine of, as commonly held in the time of the early evolutionists, 34, 36

    ---- Buffon on, 118, &c.

    Fitness, the cause of, more important than the fact that fitness is commonly fit, and therefore successful, 351

    Flat fish, Lamarck on the eyes of, 307

    Fluctuation of opinion, C. Darwin on Buffon's, the charge refuted, 97, &c., 164, 166

    Fontenelle, on theories, 22

    Foot, and model of foot, differences between, 24

    Forms of faith, or faiths of form, &c., 339

    Four main points which the early evolutionists failed to see in their connection and bearing on each other, 37, 203

    Four main principles, the, which I contended for in "Life and Habit," 37, 203, 380, 381

    Fowls and pigeons, Buffon on, 169

    GARNETT, Mr. R., and "Darwinising," 21

    Genius, Mr. Allen says I am a, 388

    Gentleman, the Church of Rome means the same by the word as we do, 395

    Geoffroy, Étienne, how small a way he goes, 196

    ---- and Isidore, trimmers, 328

    ---- on Buffon, 328

    ---- on conditions of existence, 326, 327

    ---- declares against Lamarck's hypothesis, 328

    ---- his position, 325-328

    Geoffroy, Isidore, on evolution and final causes, 9

    ---- on Buffon's fluctuation of opinion, 98, &c., 164, 166

    ---- points out the difference between the views of Buffon and Lamarck, 105

    ---- statement that Buffon's opinions fluctuated again refuted, 166

    ---- and Lamarck's hypothesis, 244-246, 329

    ---- on Buffon, 328

    ---- his position, 329

    Genealogical order, Lamarck on, 264

    ---- C. Darwin on, 265

    Generation more remarkable than reason, Hume on, 233

    Generic differences (as well as specific), Buffon on, 164

    Genius, a supreme capacity for taking pains, 76

    Geographical distribution, changed, Buffon on, 145, &c., 164

    Geometrical ratio of increase, Buffon on, 123

    ---- Lamarck, on, 280

    ---- Patrick Matthew on, 320, 321

    Germ of oak indistinguishable from that of a man, 334

    Germans, Buffon on the, 93

    Glory "comes after labour if she can," &c., 76

    Go away, because their uncles, aunts, 376

    God, embodied in living forms, and dwelling in them, 31

    ---- how far everlasting, invisible, imperishable, omnipotent, &c., 32

    ---- the unseen parts of, are as a deep-buried history, 33

    Goethe, as an evolutionist, 71

    Gradations infinitely subtle, 87

    Grant Allen, on "Evolution, Old and New," 386-388

    ---- on the decay of criticism, 388

    ---- says that "Evolutionism is an almost exclusively English impulse," 393

    Greyhound or racehorse, the well-adapted form of the, 359

    Growth attended at each step by a felicitous tempering of two antagonistic principles, 35

    Gueneau de Montbeillard, 172, 173

    HABIT," "Life and. See "Life and Habit."

    ---- rudimentary organs repeated through mere force of, 38, 39

    ---- Buffon on, 148, 159, 160, 161, 162

    ---- a second Nature, Lamarck on, 300

    Habits, or use, and organ, Lamarck on the interaction of, 292, 311

    Haeckel, on design, 4, 5

    ---- on Goethe as an evolutionist, 71

    ---- does not appear to know of Buffon as an evolutionist, 71, 393

    ---- his surprising statement concerning Lamarck, 73

    ---- his ignorance concerning Erasmus Darwin, 73, 393

    ---- on Lamarck, 246, 247

    ---- A. R. Wallace's review of his "Evolution of Man," 382, 384

    Hamlet, the "Origin of Species" like "Hamlet" without Hamlet, 363

    Handiest, a man should do whatever comes handiest, 51, 52

    Hare, Buffon on the, 123, &c.

    Hartmann's philosophy of the unconscious, and "Life and Habit," 56, 57

    Hearing, when we once reach animals so low as to have no organ of, we lose this organ for good and all, 379

    Heredity and habit, Buffon on, 148, 159, 160, 161, 162

    ---- only another term for unknown causes, unless the "Life and Habit" theory be adopted, 384

    Hering, Professor, referred to, 66, 67

    ---- his theory as given in "Nature" by Ray Lankester, 198-200

    Herschel, Sir John, compares natural selection to the Laputan method of making books, 10

    Higgling and haggling of the market, 50

    History of the universe, each organism is a, from its own point of view, 31

    Horse and ass, Buffon's most pregnant passage on the, 80, 90, 91, 100, 101, 142, 143, 155, 164, 311

    ---- and man, skeleton of the, 88, 89

    ---- and zebra, Buffon on the, example of irony, 80, 155, 164

    Hume, his saying that generation is more remarkable than reason, 233

    Huxley, Professor, referred to, 93

    ---- pointed out to Professor Mivart the difficulty in the way of natural selection, 344

    ---- his ignorance concerning the earlier history of evolution, 392, 393

    Hybridism, Buffon on, 117, 118

    Hybrids, sterility of, Lamarck on, and C. Darwin on, 272, 273

    IDEAS, the bond or nexus of our, 23, 29, 30

    Ignorance, the prevailing, concerning the earlier evolutionists, 61

    ---- it is easy to hide our, under such expressions as "plan of creation," or natural selection, 358

    Imitation, instinct not referable to, as maintained by Erasmus Darwin, 202

    Immutability of species and design commonly accepted together, 9, 10

    Improvements, small successive, in man's inventions, 44, 46, 47, 54, 55, 384

    Inaccuracy of thought, C. Darwin accused of, 359

    Incipiency, of complex structures, a difficulty in the way of the Natural selection view of evolution, 21, 22

    Incorporate, the designer is, with the organism, 30

    Increase, geometrical ratio of Buffon on the, 123

    ---- Lamarck on, 280

    ---- Patrick Matthew on, 320, 321

    Indefinite, with C. Darwin the variations are, 342, 344

    Indifference, I say I am more indifferent than I think I am, whether mind is or is not the least misleading symbol for the cause that sustains the universe, 371

    Indirect action of conditions of existence according to Lamarck, 294, 299, 306. (See "Conditions of Existence")

    Individuality, Buffon on, 128

    ---- of buds, Erasmus Darwin on the, 207, 208

    ---- our, a consensus, or full-flowing river, 318

    Infallibility, possible results of the doctrine of Papal, 406

    Insectivorous plants, Erasmus Darwin on, 206

    Instep, ligament that binds the tendons of the, Paley on the, 22

    Instinct, present, does not bar its having arisen in reason and reflection, 53, 54

    ---- returns to its earlier phase, i. e. to reason on the presence of the unfamiliar, 54, 55, 56

    ---- and reason, Buffon on, 110-116

    ---- Darwin, Erasmus, on, 115, 116, 204

    ---- not referable to imitation, as maintained by Erasmus Darwin, 202

    ---- is reason become habitual, 203

    ---- reason perfected and got by rote, 256

    ---- and reason, Lamarck on, 256, 257, 274

    ---- referred to experience and memory, by Patrick Matthew, 322

    Insult, "Evolution, Old and New," not intended as an insult to men of science, 392

    Interaction of want and power, 44, 45, 47, 217, 218, 221, 300, 323

    ---- of body and mind, Lamarck on the, 338, 339, 341

    Interesting, the more interesting the animal the more evolution Buffon puts into his account of it, 84

    Intermediate forms, Lamarck on, 283, 286

    ---- C. Darwin, 284, 285

    Inventions, small successive improvements in man's, and development of, analogous to that of organism, 44, 46, 47, 54, 55, 384

    Irony, good-natured and the reverse, 91

    ---- an apology for, and explanation how far it is legitimate, 111, 112

    ---- Buffon's, 78, &c., 91, 92, 93, 155, 157, 163, 164

    JARDINE, Sir W., on Buffon's character, 82

    Johnson, Dr., and Erasmus Darwin, 184, 185

    Joints, Paley on the human, 19, 20

    Juggle, Paley's argument a juggle, unless man has had a bonâ fide personal, and therefore organic designer, 14, 16

    KNEE-PAN, Paley on the human, 18

    Knowledge, nomenclature mistaken for, 141

    LABOUR, glory comes after, if she can, 76

    Lamarck, had brain upon the brain, 36

    ---- never quite recognized design, 39

    ---- Haeckel's surprising statement concerning, 73

    ---- wherein he mainly differs from Buffon, 105

    ---- memoir of, 235

    ---- his connection with Buffon, as tutor to his son, &c., 237, 258

    ---- his daughters, 242, 253

    ---- his poverty and blindness, 242, 253

    ---- Isidore Geoffroy on, bad caricature of his teaching, 244-246

    ---- Haeckel on, 246, 247

    ---- never seriously discussed, 247

    ---- "the well-known doctrine of," C. Darwin's reference to, 249, 250, 251, 298, 314, 376

    ---- on the opposition his theory met with, 252

    ---- too old to have begun his unequal contest, 253

    ---- on the feeling of animals, 254, 255

    ---- too theory-ridden, 254

    ---- misled by Buffon (query), 255

    ---- took from Buffon without sufficient acknowledgment, 255, 258, 260, 311

    ---- as compared with Dr. Erasmus Darwin, 257

    ---- like Dr. E. Darwin, sees struggle and modification turn mainly round three great wants, 257, 279, 300, 309

    ---- when and how he came over to the side of mutability, 258

    ---- and the French translation of the "Loves of the Plant," 259

    ---- on comparative anatomy, 266

    ---- on species, 267, &c.

    ---- on conditions of existence (circonstances), 105, 268, 270, 271, 275, 277, 278, 281, 291, 292, 294, 295, 298, 299, 300, &c.

    ---- on instinct, 274

    ---- on animals and plants under domestication, 275, 293, 296, 297, 300

    ---- on extinct species, 277

    ---- anticipated Lyell in rejecting catastrophes, 277

    ---- on the geometrical ratio of increase and struggle for existence, 280-282

    ---- on embryonic development, 289

    ---- the main principles which he supposes to underlie variations, 292, 299, 338, 339

    ---- his contention that plants have neither actions nor habits, 295

    ---- on use and disuse, 294, 296, 299, 301, 302, 304, 305, 307-309

    ---- on the various breeds of the dog, 297

    ---- habit a second nature, 300

    ---- like Erasmus Darwin and Buffon, understood the survival of the fittest, 301

    ---- on the way in which serpents have lost their legs, 303

    ---- on wading and aquatic birds, 305

    ---- on the eyes of flat fish, 307

    ---- on man, 311, &c.

    ---- on a single instance of considerable variation under domestication, 311

    ---- on speech, 313, 314

    ---- on the upright position of man and certain apes, 313

    ---- his, and Étienne Geoffroy's views on conditions of existence, 326, 327, 328

    ---- his hypothesis, and Isidore Geoffroy, 329

    ---- Herbert Spencer on, 330, 331

    ---- desired to discover the law underlying variations, 337

    ---- the extent to which he and C. Darwin take common ground, 335-337

    ---- on body and mind, 338, 339, 341

    ---- on his theory variations will be definite, will appear in large numbers of individuals at the same time, for long periods together, 341

    ---- how he and C. Darwin treat the winglessness of Madeira beetles respectively, 373-380

    ---- on the eyes and ears of cave-inhabiting animals, 378, 379

    Laputan method of making books, the, and natural selection, 11

    Lawyer's deed, if we come across a very intricate, &c., 27

    Leopard, the, can change his spots if it becomes worth his while to try long enough, 40

    Lewes, G. H., on embryology, 25

    ---- his objection to the tentativeness with which the same errors are repeated generation after generation, 26

    ---- his objection to C. Darwin's language concerning natural selection, 346

    Lewes, G. H., on natural selection, 348, 349, 359

    Life, some remarks about the criterion of, that I must retract, 279

    ---- one Proteus principal of, 320

    "Life and Habit," what I believe to have been its most important features, 67, 203, 204

    ---- recapitulation of the main principle insisted on, 37, 56, 203, 380, 381, 384

    ---- and Hartmann's philosophy of the unconscious, German review, 56, 57

    Lifetime, considerable modifications effected during a single, 304

    ---- the changes undergone by organisms during a single, Herbert Spencer, on, 332-334

    Ligament, the, which binds down the tendons of the instep, 21

    Living, Paley is but doing his best to earn an honest, 29

    ---- forms of faith, or faiths of form, 339

    Lines, no sharp can be drawn, 47

    Lion and tiger, Buffon on the, 143, 145

    Llama, Buffon on the hereditary ills of the, 161

    Longevity, the principle underlying, 67, 380, 381

    Loopholes for escape, the "Origin of Species" full of, 358

    "Loves of the Plants," French translation of the, 63, 259

    Lungs for respiration, and corkscrew for corks, Professor Clifford on, 7. (See also p. 58)

    Lyell, Sir C., and Lamarck, 277

    ---- on the similarity between Lamarck's theory and Mr. Darwin's, 336, 337

    MACHINE, Paley declares animals to be neither wholly machines nor wholly not machines, 14

    Madeira beetles, the ways in which Lamarck and C. Darwin would treat their winglessness, 373-380

    Maillet, de, referred to, 70

    Mainspring, the true, of our existence lies not in these muscles, &c., 32

    Man, the designer of man, 30

    ---- and horse, skeleton of the, 88, 89

    ---- and the ape, 90

    ---- and the lower animals, Buffon on, 107, 108

    ---- Lamarck on, 311, &c.

    Manner, the, is the man himself, 77

    ---- "but this is Mr. Darwin's", 378

    Manufacture, the, of tools and of organs, two species of the same genus, 39

    Margin, there is a margin in every organic structure, &c., 49, 50

    ---- on the margin of the self-evident the greatest purchase is obtainable, 197

    Market, the higgling and haggling of the, 50

    Martins, M., his life of Lamarck, 235, &c.

    Matter less important than the manner, 77

    ---- and mind, inseparable, 371

    Matthew, Mr. Patrick, his work on naval timber and arboriculture, 64, 65

    ---- extracts from, 315, &c.

    ---- Mr. C. Darwin on, 315

    ---- on animals and plants under domestication, 324

    ---- on will as influencing organism, 320, 321, 322

    ---- on the struggle for existence with survival of the fittest, 320, 322

    ---- and natural selection, 323

    ---- on instinct and memory, and on the continued personality of parents in offspring, 321, 322, 323

    Means, C. Darwin's dangerous use of this word, 345

    ---- one sine quâ non for a thing is as much a means of that thing's coming about as anything else is, 349

    Mechanism of animals, Paley on the, 14

    Mechanism of animals, evidence of design in any ordinary, 15

    Memory, and life and heredity, 37, 38, 39, 56, 67, 198-203, 332, 380, 381

    ---- Professor Hering on, 198-200

    ---- Patrick Matthew on, 322

    Meteoric, both want and power are, 44, 45

    Meninges, Buffon on the, 132

    Microcosm, each organism a history of the universe from its own point of view, 31

    Microscope, illustration from successive improvements in the, 46, 47

    Mind, "the least inadequate and misleading symbol," for the power that has designed organism, 3, 371

    ---- and body, Lamarck on, 338, 339, 341

    ---- and matter inseparable, 371

    Misfortune, take advantage of, 51

    Misrepresentation, "great is the power of steady," 251

    Missionaries should avoid trying to effect sudden modifications, 183

    Mistake, the power to make, rated highly, 29

    ---- importance of, depends on magnitude rather than on the direction, 50

    Mivart, Professor, says that, "Mind is the least adequate and misleading symbol," &c., 3, 371

    ---- referred to, 22, 66, 67

    ---- admits that his objection does not tell against the Lamarckian theory of evolution, 343

    ---- points out that the admission of a principle underlying variations is fatal to C. Darwin's theory concerning natural selection, 343

    ---- on C. Darwin's "haphazard, indefinite variations," 343

    ---- how Professor Huxley pointed out to him the objection to C. Darwin's theory concerning natural selection, 344

    ---- asks what is natural selection? and declares it to be repudiated by its propounder, 369

    ---- declares it to be "nothing," and a puerile hypothesis, 370, 371

    ---- declares the causes of variation to be the causes of the distinction of species, 370

    Model, artificial, of a foot, and true foot, difference between, 24

    Modification. It is only on modification that reason reasserts itself, 55

    ---- there have been two factors of, one producing variations, and the other accumulating them, 227

    ---- arrived at by struggle round three great wants, Erasmus Darwin on, 226-229

    ---- Lamarck on the same, 257, 279, 300, 301

    ---- the cause of survival, not survival the cause of modification, 302

    Moral, an organism is most, when looking a little ahead, but not too far, 44

    ---- struggle, the history of organic development, the history of a, 45

    ---- more, and safer, to be behind the age than in front of it, 401

    Movement, Buffon's great criterion of sensation, 127

    Mummies, Egyptian, Lamarck on, 274, 275

    Murphy, Rev. J. J., mentioned, 22

    ---- referred to, 66, 67

    Mutability of species commonly held to be incompatible with a belief in design, 9, 10

    Mystery-mongering, that Buffon wished to protest against, 81, 171

    Mystification, scientific, and orthodoxy, Buffon on, 138

    NAIVELY, as Mr. Darwin naively adds, "sometimes equally convenient," 354

    Natural selection, the essence of the theory is that the variations shall have been mainly accidental, 7

    Natural selection, the unerring skill of, 9

    ---- Sir William Thomson and Sir John Herschel on, 10

    ---- Button, and, "by some chance common enough with Nature," 122

    ---- spoken of as though synonymous with descent with modification, 248, 285, 356

    ---- C. Darwin attributes the instincts of neuter insects to, 249

    ---- Mr. Patrick Matthew and, 323

    ---- like the secretion of a cuttle-fish, 332

    ---- G. H. Lewes's objection to C. Darwin's language concerning, 346

    ---- if this is declared to be a cause, the fact of variation is declared to be the cause of variation, 347

    ---- declared by C. Darwin to be a means of variation, 347

    ---- treated as a cause, 348

    ---- G. H. Lewes on, 348, 349, 350

    ---- identity with "conditions of existence," 351-354

    ---- according to C. Darwin, "fully embraces" and yet "is included in" conditions of existence, 355

    ---- a cloak for want of precision of thought, and of substantial difference from Lamarck, 358

    ---- "some have even imagined that it induces variability;" and small wonder, considering C. Darwin's language concerning it, 362

    ---- C. Darwin's reply to those who have objected to the term, 362-368

    ---- a cloak of difference from C. Darwin's predecessors, under which there lurks a concealed identity of opinion as to main facts, 362, 363

    ---- "implies only the preservation of such variations as arise," &c., 363

    ---- admitted by C. Darwin to be a false term, 364

    ---- the complaint is that the expression has been retained when an avowedly more accurate one is to hand, 365, 366

    ---- only another way of saying Nature, 368, 369

    ---- the dislike of it is increasing, 368, 369

    ---- Francis Darwin does not use the expression, 368, 369

    ---- daily and hourly scrutinizing throughout the world, &c., 369

    ---- practically repudiated by C. Darwin himself, 369

    ---- Professor Mivart declares it to be "simply nothing," 370

    ---- a "puerile hypothesis," 371

    ---- and not disuse, the true main cause of the winglessness of Madeira beetles, according to C. Darwin, 374

    ---- not the main cause of the winglessness of Madeira beetles, according to C. Darwin, 377

    ---- "combined probably with disuse," will account, according to C. Darwin, for the winglessness of Madeira beetles, 375

    Naturalistes, le peuple des, 80, 171

    Nature, the personification of comparatively venial, 367

    ---- and natural selection the same thing, 368, 369

    ---- the most important means of modification, and variation the cause of variation, 369

    Neck, Paley on the human, 17, 18

    Need, sense of, the main idea in connection with evolution that is left with the reader by the "Zoonomia," or "Philosophie Zoologique," 363

    Needle, 20,000 devils dancing a saraband on the point of a, 216

    Nest, a bird will alter its nest a little, to meet altered circumstances, 55

    Nests, birds', Dr. E. Darwin on, 201

    Neuter insects, "the demonstrative case of neuter insects," &c., 249, 298, 314

    New countries, Buffon a hater of, 146

    Nomenclature, mistaken for knowledge, 141

    Nottingham market-place, Erasmus Darwin in, 182, 184, 197

    OAK and man, the germs of, indistinguishable, 334

    ---- man may become as long-lived as the, 382

    Obvious, Erasmus Darwin had no wish to see far beyond the, 197

    Oken, alluded to, 72

    Old age, the phenomena of, 67, 204, 381

    ---- and new worlds, Buffon on the fauna of, 145, &c.

    One source for all life, Buffon on, 91

    ---- Erasmus Darwin on, 109, 233

    Oneness of personality between parents and offspring, 37, 38, 39

    ---- Buffon on the, 151

    ---- Erasmus Darwin and Professor Hering on the, 198-200

    ---- Dr. E. Darwin's failure to grasp the whole facts in connection with this, 198, 201, 203

    ---- Dr. E. Darwin on, 214, 215

    ---- Patrick Matthew on, 322, 323

    ---- mentioned, 332, 380, 381

    Orang-outang, Buffon on the, 156-159

    Organ and use. See "Use."

    ---- and sense, interaction of the, Buffon on, 127

    ---- and faculty, Lamarck on, 255

    Organs are living tools, 2

    ---- the manufacture of, and that of tools, two species of the same genus, 39, 43, &c.

    ---- are the expressions of mental phases, 339, 341

    Organic structures have a margin, 49, 50

    Organic strictures and inorganic, Buffon on the, 153, &c.

    Organisms, have been developed as man's inventions have, 44, 46, 47, 384

    "Origin of Species," the, cannot take permanent rank in the literature of evolution, 62

    ---- has no raison d'être, if natural selection is not a cause of variation, 346

    ---- a piece of intellectual sleight of hand, 346

    ---- compared to the advice of a lawyer who wanted to leave plenty of loopholes, or to a cobbled Act of Parliament, 358

    ---- is "Hamlet" with the part of Hamlet cut out, 363

    ---- most readers would say that it advocated natural selection as the most important cause of variation, 363

    ---- and the "Zoonomia," or the "Philosophie Zoologique"; the one upholds natural selection, the other, sense of need, 363

    Orthodoxy, scientific, and mystification, Buffon on, 138

    ---- scientific, clamouring for endowment, 360

    ---- dangers of, 368

    Overseeing tends to oversight, 197

    PAINS, genius a supreme capacity for taking, 76

    Painting, a man should do something, no matter what, 51, 52

    Paley, quotations from, 12, &c.

    ---- his argument a juggle, unless some one designed man, much as man designed the watch, 14, 16

    ---- on ordinary mechanism, as showing design, 15

    ---- on the human neck, 16, 17

    ---- on the patella, 18

    ---- on the joints, 19, 20

    ---- as a writer against evolution, 21

    ---- on the ligament that binds the tendons of the instep, 21, 22

    ---- opposes the view that structures have been formed through appetency, endeavour or effort, 22, 45

    ---- we turn on him and say, Show us your designer, 29

    ---- asks, How will our philosopher get an eye? 46

    ---- his "Natural Theology" written throughout at the "Zoonomia," 195

    ---- never gives a reference when quoting an opponent, 195, 306

    Pantheism and Rome will in the end be the two sole combatants, 401

    ---- common ground held by Rome and Pantheism, 403-405

    ---- of Paul, 404

    Parents and offspring, oneness of personality between (see "Personality")

    Passions, of like passions, men of science are, with other pastors and prophets, 253

    Patella, or knee-pan, Paley on the, 18

    Paul, St., his pantheistic tendencies, 404

    ---- we want to accept him literally, 405

    Peace, the, that passeth understanding, 35

    Perception and sensation, Buffon on the difference between, 129, 130

    Personality, oneness of, between parents and offspring, 37, 38, 39

    ---- Buffon on the, 151

    ---- Erasmus Darwin and Professor Hering on the, 198-200

    ---- Erasmus Darwin's failure to grasp the whole conception, 198, 201, 203

    ---- Erasmus Darwin on the, 214, 215

    ---- Patrick Matthew on the, 322, 323

    ---- mentioned, 332, 380, 381

    Personification, the, of Nature, comparatively venial, 367

    Pessimism: "Which is the pessimist I or Mr. Darwin?" 59

    Peuple des Naturalistes, le, 80, 171

    "Philosophie Zoologique," summary of, 261-314

    ---- the, leaves "sense of need" on the reader's mind; the "Origin of Species," natural selection, 363

    Pig, Buffon on the, 118, &c.

    Pigeons and fowls, Buffon on, 169

    Plaisanterie, Button's disclaimer of, 93

    Planted upside down, the vertebrata regarded as vegetables, 137

    Plants under domestication, Buffon on, 167, &c.

    ---- Dr. Erasmus Darwin, on the life of, 206, &c.

    ---- Lamarck's assertion that they have no action nor habits, 294, 295

    Plato upheld teleology, 4

    Plus il a su, &c., 44

    Poem, a, by Dr. Erasmus Darwin, 189

    Poetry, Dr. Erasmus Darwin's, 83, 189, 193

    Pope's shoes, scientists would step into the, if we would let them, 360, 394

    Portrait of Mr. Day, author of "Sandford and Merton," 180

    Potto, the missing forefinger of the, 303

    Power and desire, interaction of, 44, 45, 47, 127, 217, 221, 300, 323

    Praising, with faint damnation, 111

    Prescience, need not extend over more than the next step, and yet the whole road may have been travelled presciently, 52, 384

    Present, development due to a wise use of the, 50-52

    Probable, whatever in the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas is not probable is to be rejected, 402, 403

    Proficiency is due to design if each step was taken designedly, though the end was not far foreseen, 52, 384

    Protestantism tends towards disintegration, 396

    Proteus principle of life, one, 320

    Pump, Erasmus Darwin's poetry about the, 84, 193

    Purpose, instinctive actions were once done with a, 54

    ---- spent or extinct, and rudimentary organs, 38, 383

    Purposive, if each step is purposive, the whole is purposive, 52, 384

    Purposiveness: I maintain the lungs to be as purposive us the corkscrew, 5, 6, 7, 58

    RACE, the runners in a, and natural selection, 366, 367

    ---- significance of the words being used for a breed and a competition, 366, 367

    Racehorse or greyhound, "the well-adapted forms of the," 359

    Ranunculus aquatilis, Lamarck's passage on, 260, 297

    Raleigh, Sir Walter, and evolution, 21, 70

    Ray Lankester, Professor, on Hering's theory connecting memory and heredity, 198-200

    Reason, there is less reason than feeling in animals, Buffon, 51

    ---- perfected becomes instinct, but reasserts itself when the circumstances alter, 54, 55, 56, 203

    ---- and instinct, Buffon on, 110, 116

    ---- Erasmus Darwin on, 115, 116, 201-205

    ---- a less remarkable faculty than generation, Hume on, 233

    ---- and instinct, Lamarck on, 256, 274

    ---- declared to be incipient instinct, 256

    Réel, au, Buffon's use of these words, 126

    Relativity of the sciences, Buffon on the, 140

    Religion, Buffon's appeals to, 91, 115

    Reopen settled questions, animals cannot, serpents must have no more than four legs, 303

    Resume earlier habits, the tendency to, on the approach of a difficulty, 312, 313

    Retrogressive, Mr. Darwin's views of evolution retrogressive, 66

    Revelation, Buffon's appeals to, against evolution, 91, 115

    Reviews of "Evolution, Old and New," 385, &c.

    Riches, the normal growth of, and evolution, 222

    Roman Empire, the, prophetic, 397

    Romanes, G. R., on "Evolution, Old and New," 391-393

    Rome, Church of, means the same by "gentleman" as we do, 395

    ---- I would join, if I could, 395, 396

    ---- a unifier, 398

    ---- the only source from which a church can come, 398-401

    ---- and Pantheism, the ultimate fight will be between, 401

    ---- points of agreement between Rome and Pantheists, 403-405

    ---- may, and should get rid of Protestantism by outbidding it, 407

    Rousseau, Buffon would not play part of, 81

    Rudimentary organs, the crux of the early evolutionist in respect of design, 34

    ---- are now mere cant formulæ, force of habit, 38, 383

    ---- like the protuberance at the bottom of a tobacco-pipe, 38

    ---- Buffon would not accept them as designed, 83

    ---- Buffon on, 120

    ---- Professor Haeckel on, 383

    Run, how did the winner come to be able to run ever such a little faster than his fellows, 367

    Runners in a race and natural selection, 366, 367

    "SANDFORD and Merton," Miss Seward on the author of, 179, 180

    Saints will commonly strain a point or two in their own favour, 253

    Saturday Review on "Evolution, Old and New," 389-391

    Savery, Captain, 54

    Science, men of, of like passions with other priests and prophets, 253

    ---- not a kingdom into which a poor man can enter easily, 253

    ---- the leaders of will generally burke new-born wit unless, &c., 315

    ---- not of that kind which desires to know, 392

    Scientific orthodoxy and mystification, Buffon on, 138

    ---- danger of, 360, 368

    Scramble, birds learned to swim through scrambling, 48, 51

    Self-indulgence, virtue has ever erred rather on the side of, than on that of asceticism, 35

    Sensation, Buffon on, 126, 129

    Sense, "in one sense," 355

    Sensitive plants, Dr. E. Darwin on, 206, 210

    Seriously, Buffon speaking, 126

    Serpents, how it is that they have lost their legs, 302

    Seward, Miss, her life of Erasmus Darwin, 174, &c.

    Shakspeare and Handel address the many as well as the few, 81

    Shortest day, and shortest day but one, no difference perceptible between, 48

    Skeletons, the, of man and of the horse, 88, &c.

    Skill, the unerring, of natural selection, 9

    Siamese twins, desire and power compared to, 218, 300

    Simplicity, happy, an example of, 276

    Sisters, "his, and his cousins and his aunts," 253

    Slit, a slit in one tendon to let another pass through, 20

    Something a man should do, no matter what, 51

    Sometimes, "equally convenient" ("the survival of the fittest" with natural selection), 9, 354, 365

    Son, the people who can get good sons and retain their affection are the only ones worth studying from, 76

    Sorbonne, the, and Buffon, 82, 84

    Sorbonnes, never do like people who write in this way, 143

    Specialists, embryos are, 28

    Species, Buffon on the causes or means of transformation, 159, &c.

    ---- Lamarck on, 267, &c.

    ---- clusters of, Lamarck on, 288

    ---- C. Darwin on, 289

    Specific characteristics vary more than generic, Lamarck on, 287, 288

    ---- C. Darwin on, 288

    Speech, Lamarck on, 313, 314

    Spencer, Herbert, on Lamarck's hypothesis, 330, 331

    ---- a follower of Buffon, Dr. Erasmus Darwin and Lamarck, 332

    Spent, or extinct purpose, and rudimentary organs, 383

    Spontaneous: C. Darwin uses this word in connection with variability, 358

    ---- variability (or unknown causes), C. Darwin, on what it will account for, or make known, 358

    Steam engine, latest development of, not foreseen, though each immediate step in advance was so, 54, 384

    ---- design lost sight of in the most common patterns, as with a bird's-nest, or the wheel, 55

    Step, if each step is purposive, the whole road has been travelled purposively, 52, 384

    ---- only the few nearest are taken definitely, 44, 384

    Sterility of hybrids, Lamarck on, 272

    ---- C. Darwin on, 273

    Stock, Buffon on the, and the diaphragm, 130

    Stronger, the, succeed, and the weaker fail, 320, 321

    Strongest, the, eat the weaker, 282

    Struggle for existence, Buffon on the, 123

    ---- and hence modification, according to Dr. Erasmus Darwin, mainly conversant about three wants, 226-229, 232

    ---- comparison between Erasmus Darwin and Lamarck's views on the foregoing, 257

    ---- Lamarck on the foregoing, 279

    ---- and survival of the fittest, Lamarck on the, 281, 282

    ---- Patrick Matthew on, 321

    Style, Buffon on, 76, 77

    Sudden, the question what is too, to be settled by higgling and haggling, 50

    ---- modifications, missionaries should avoid trying to effect, 183

    Superficial, philosophy of the, 34, 35, 36, 198, 204

    Supply and demand, and desire and power, 223, 300

    Survival of the fittest, a synonym for natural selection, 9

    ---- Dr. Erasmus Darwin on the, 227

    ---- in the struggle for existence, Lamarck on the, 281, 282

    ---- understood and admitted by Buffon, Erasmus Darwin, and Lamarck, 301

    ---- subsequent to modification, and therefore not the cause of it, 302, 346

    ---- Patrick Matthew on, 321

    ---- this is not a theory, but a fact, 356, 357

    Swimming, no shore bird ever set itself to learn, of malice prepense, 48, 51

    TAIL, the beaver's, has become an incarnate trowel, 8

    Teething, the pain an infant feels is the death-cry of many a good cell, 75

    Teleological, failure of the early evolutionists to see their position as, 34

    Teleology, statement of the question, 1

    ---- Aristotle denied, Plato upheld, 4

    ---- the, of Paley and the theologians, 12, &c.

    ---- internal as much teleology as external, 36

    ---- See also "Design."

    Telescope, Lord Rosse's, and dew-drop, 44, 47

    Tempering, the felicitous, of two great contradictory principles, 35

    Tendon, a slit in one, to let another pass through, 20

    Terminology of botany harder than botany, 108

    ---- Buffon on, 140, 141

    Test, Buffon's, as to the name an object is to bear, 115

    ---- of perception and sensation, Buffon's, 127

    Theological writer, few passages in any, displease me more, &c., 368

    Theory, the survival of the fittest is a fact, not a theory, 356, 357

    Theories, true, Fontenelle on, 22, 23

    ---- to be ordered out of court if troublesome, 35

    This: "I can no more believe in this," &c., 359

    ---- "it is impossible to attribute to this cause," 358

    Thomas, St., Aquinas, Papal encyclical on, 402, 403

    Thomson, Sir W., natural selection and design, 10

    Thought is expressed in organ, 339, 341

    Time, Buffon on, 103

    ---- Lamarck on, 241

    Tobacco-pipe, a rudimentary organ on a, 38

    Toes, a man who plays the violin with his, 50

    Tools, organs are living tools, 2

    ---- the manufacture of, and that of organs, two species of the same genus, 39

    Touch, all senses modifications of the sense of touch, 47

    Transformation of species, Buffon on the causes or means of, 159

    Translation of the "Loves of the Plants" into French, 63, 258, 259

    Translation of the "Zoonomia" into German, 71

    ---- of Dr. E. Darwin's other works, 195

    Trapa Natans, Erasmus Darwin's note on, 260

    Treviranus alluded to, 72

    Tree, life seen as a tree, by Lamarck, 269

    ---- by C. Darwin, 270

    ---- nature compared to a, by Buffon, 171

    Trees, the blind man who saw men as trees walking, 137

    Trowel, the beaver has an incarnate trowel, 8

    True, vitally, 227

    ---- all very, as far as it goes (that Nature is the most important means of modification), 369

    Truism, the survival of the fittest, a, 351

    Tutbury bull running, 187

    Tyndall, Professor, a rhapsody about C. Darwin, 41

    ---- calls evolution C. Darwin's theory, 360, 361

    UNCLES and aunts do not beget their nephews and nieces, 367, 376

    Unconscious, our acquired habits come to be done as unconsciously as though instinctive, on repetition, 56

    ---- difference between my view of the, and Von Hartmann's, 58

    Unconsciousness, the, with which habitual actions come to be performed, 37, 38, 39, 56-58, 67, 203, 332, 381

    Understanding, the peace of mind that passeth, 35

    Unity of the individual, Buffon on the, 127, 128. (See "Oneness")

    "Unknown causes," according to Mr. Darwin, can do so much, but not so much more, 359

    ---- their identity with spontaneous variability, 359

    ---- heredity only another name for, unless the "Life and Habit" theory be adopted, 384

    Upright position in man and certain apes, and children, Lamarck on, 312

    Upside down, the vertebrata are perambulating vegetables planted, 137

    Use and organ, 44, 45, 47, 217, 218, 221, 292, 294, 296, 299, 301, 302, 304, 305, 307-309, 311, 323

    VACUUM, an omniscient and omnipotent, 28

    Vague, efforts and desires are vague in the outset, 47, 52, 384

    Variation, C. Darwin declares the fact of variation to be the cause of variation, 8, 9, 347, 369

    Variations, one factor of modification provides, the other accumulates, 227

    ---- Lamarck strove to discover the law underlying, 337

    ---- C. Darwin sees no cause underlying them, 339, 340

    ---- according to Lamarck, they will tend to appear in definite directions in large numbers of individuals, for long periods together; according to C. Darwin they will not do thus, 341

    ---- must appear before they can be preserved, 346

    ---- the cause of variations is the cause of species (Professor Mivart on this), 370

    Vary, man cannot vary his practices much more than animals can, 55

    "Vestiges of Creation," the, 65

    ---- C. Darwin on the, 65

    ---- the author of, on Lamarck, 247

    ---- Darwin's treatment of, 247, 248

    Virtue has ever erred on the side of excess than on that of asceticism, 35

    Violin, a man who plays the, with his toes, 50

    Vitally true, 227

    Volition. (See "Will")

    Voltaire, Buffon would not play the part of, 81

    WALLACE, A. R., his review of Professor Haeckel's "Evolution of Man," 382-384

    Want and power, interaction of, 44, 45, 47, 48, 217, 218, 221, 300, 323

    Wasp, cutting a fly in half, Dr. Erasmus Darwin on, 205

    Watch, Paley's argument from the, 13

    Weaker, the strongest eat the, 282

    Wealth, the normal growth of, and evolution, 222

    Web-footed, how birds, became, 48, 49, 51

    ---- development of, birds, Lamarck on, 305

    ---- Paley on, 305

    Wedge, Buffon let in the thin end of the wedge, by saying that changed habits modify form, 105, 106

    Whisky, God keep you from--if he can, 176

    Will, Patrick Matthew on, as influencing organism, 320-322. (See also "Desire," "Design," "Want," "Wish")

    Will-o'-the-wisp, C. Darwin like a, 372

    Wish and power, their interaction, 44, 45, 47, 48, 217, 218, 221, 300, 323

    Wit, brevity may be its soul, but the leaders of science, &c., 315

    Worcester, the Marquis of, 54

    Words are apt to turn out compendious false analogies, 365

    Worms, reasonable creatures, 255

    Worth, nothing worth looking at or doing, except at a fair price, 35

    Wright, of Derby, his portrait of Mr. Day, 180

    ZEBRA and horse, Buffon on the, 80, 155, 164

    "Zoonomia," German translation of the, 71

    ---- Paley's "Natural Theology" written at the, 195

    ---- fuller quotations from the, 214, &c.

    ---- the, and the "Origin of Species," the different ideas that an average reader would carry away with him from these two works ("Sense of Need" and "Natural Selection"), 363
    Chapter 25
    Previous Chapter
    If you're writing a Samuel Butler essay and need some advice, post your Samuel Butler essay question on our Facebook page where fellow bookworms are always glad to help!

    Top 5 Authors

    Top 5 Books

    Book Status
    Finished
    Want to read
    Abandoned

    Are you sure you want to leave this group?