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    Act 5, Scene VI

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    Chapter 20
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    SCENE VI. Another part of the plains.

    Enter AJAX
    AJAX
    Troilus, thou coward Troilus, show thy head!

    Enter DIOMEDES

    DIOMEDES
    Troilus, I say! where's Troilus?

    AJAX
    What wouldst thou?

    DIOMEDES
    I would correct him.

    AJAX
    Were I the general, thou shouldst have my office
    Ere that correction. Troilus, I say! what, Troilus!

    Enter TROILUS

    TROILUS
    O traitor Diomed! turn thy false face, thou traitor,
    And pay thy life thou owest me for my horse!

    DIOMEDES
    Ha, art thou there?

    AJAX
    I'll fight with him alone: stand, Diomed.

    DIOMEDES
    He is my prize; I will not look upon.

    TROILUS
    Come, both you cogging Greeks; have at you both!

    Exeunt, fighting

    Enter HECTOR

    HECTOR
    Yea, Troilus? O, well fought, my youngest brother!

    Enter ACHILLES

    ACHILLES
    Now do I see thee, ha! have at thee, Hector!

    HECTOR
    Pause, if thou wilt.

    ACHILLES
    I do disdain thy courtesy, proud Trojan:
    Be happy that my arms are out of use:
    My rest and negligence befriends thee now,
    But thou anon shalt hear of me again;
    Till when, go seek thy fortune.

    Exit

    HECTOR
    Fare thee well:
    I would have been much more a fresher man,
    Had I expected thee. How now, my brother!

    Re-enter TROILUS

    TROILUS
    Ajax hath ta'en AEneas: shall it be?
    No, by the flame of yonder glorious heaven,
    He shall not carry him: I'll be ta'en too,
    Or bring him off: fate, hear me what I say!
    I reck not though I end my life to-day.

    Exit

    Enter one in sumptuous armour

    HECTOR
    Stand, stand, thou Greek; thou art a goodly mark:
    No? wilt thou not? I like thy armour well;
    I'll frush it and unlock the rivets all,
    But I'll be master of it: wilt thou not,
    beast, abide?
    Why, then fly on, I'll hunt thee for thy hide.

    Exeunt
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